Episode

11/27 Never Trust ‘Never Trump’ w/ MR Crew

November 27, 2017

Good day! On today’s Majority Report, the MR crew breaks down the news, including: The archbishop of Canterbury doesn’t understand why American evangelicals support Trump, Bill Kristol finds his inner careerist on Twitter, Ben Wittes of the Brookings Institute figures out Trump is bad, and neocon David Frum is equally disingenuous. Come back and talk to us when you #NeverTrumpers bring something to the table.

On the fun half: John from San Antonio thinks the Democrats can overcome gerrymandering, Sam will win the lottery before Trump is impeached, Ronald Raygun bemoans the low bar for entry into #theresistance (and workshops an idea for a movie), Mulvaney is going to “drain the swamp” by destroying the CFPB, Breitbart’s Joel Pollack defends Roy Moore with an analogy to Ringo Starr, Jamie discusses socialist feminism with Tammy from Texas, Geraldo thinks Trump is “punching down” at Time Magazine, and the gang discusses the false dichotomy between class and identity.

Get 30% off of the MR blend at Just Coffee, MR Holiday! Go to Just Coffee Coop now.

Follow the Majority Report crew on Twitter:

@SamSeder

@MattLech

@_michaelbrooks

@jamie_elizabeth

@bf1nn

Past Episodes

Sam and Emma host public sector immigration lawyer Daniel Melo to discuss his recent book Borderlines: The Edges of U.S. Capitalism, Immigration, and Democracy, which contextualizes immigration policy within the history of the US, and exploring what we can do to push back against the unfair ...
Sam and Emma tackle a huge last week in news, as well as what's coming down the pike in Congress, the courts, and more. They also speak with Bhairavi Desai, Executive Director of the New York Taxi Workers Alliance (NYTWA), to discuss NYTWA's new debt forgiveness campaign for Medallion cab ...
Sam and Emma host Amanda Montell, linguist and host of the Sounds Like A Cult podcast, to discuss her recent book Cultish: The Language of Fanaticism, on the social role of cults, how it has changed, and the influence it has on our language today. They start off by looking at the discourse ...