Episode

12/17 Bob Herbert: The Real Nelson Mandela

December 17, 2013

Demos Senior Fellow and former New York Times columnist Bob Herbert explains the radical politics of Nelson Mandela and Martin Luther King Jr. Why Mandela did not renounce violence, the absence of political militancy in American politics, how the US whitewashes radical politics, Mandela’s commitment to social and economic justice, how do you sustain radical politics, why economic justice is the future of politics and why everyone should read Nelson Mandela’s autobiography Long Walk to Freedom and the importance of reading Dr. King’s work as well.

On The “Fun” Half: a Trial Judge rules that the NSA’s collection of metadata “almost certainly violates the constitution” Republican state rep promises armed insurrection if Scott Brown becomes one of the states Senators, more success from the auto bailout, did Chris Christie order traffic jams as a political payback? And your IMs.

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